Age and paranormal experiences?  

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scarygothgirl
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03/03/2017 3:35 pm  

I've noticed that a lot of people who post online about their experiences with the paranormal seem to have had these experiences when they were teenagers. 

Do you think this is because teenagers are more likely to post of the internet and less likely to tell themselves that they were imagining it? Or is it possible that there is a link with the extreme changes that the brain goes through during the teenage years? Could these changes make the brain more susceptible to the paranormal? Or more susceptable to hallucinations and overactive imaginations?

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nightshade
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04/03/2017 4:24 pm  

There was a documentary I watched (can't remember the title of it as it was a good few years ago now) about poltergeist activity etc and it did state that most of the case studies around the world seem to involve young adults, mainly teenagers, and there is a theory that the hormonal changes and psychological changes that teenagers go through somehow seem to cause a lot of repressed emotions to manifest itself in the form of a poltergeist. 

I do think there could be something to it as the brain does seem to be overactive during this stage of life, all sorts of chemical reactions happening within the brain.

"It's because you got no guts. Oh, how embarrassing... there they are. They were inside you the whole time. You did have guts. I've never been so wrong in my whole life!"


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scarygothgirl
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11/03/2017 6:00 pm  

I have read about that theory too. I've also read about a theory that young children (under the age of 5 I think) are more likely to have paranormal abilities, such as the ability to speak to the dead and remember past lives, which then disappear with age.

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nightshade
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12/03/2017 10:40 am  

I actually watched a paranormal documentary (again, can't recall the name as I watch so many lol) and there was I think some sort of scientist guy who said when children are born there is a certain part of the eyeball which allows them to physically see things us adults can't, it's something to do with infrasound or something. When you enter your teenage years that part of the eye becomes dormant or its use fades away or something. It apparently is supposed to explain why children can see ghosts etc which I thought was pretty cool. 

Edited: 7 months  ago

"It's because you got no guts. Oh, how embarrassing... there they are. They were inside you the whole time. You did have guts. I've never been so wrong in my whole life!"


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The Paranormal Scholar
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27/03/2017 12:01 pm  
Posted by: nightshade

 

I actually watched a paranormal documentary (again, can't recall the name as I watch so many lol) and there was I think some sort of scientist guy who said when children are born there is a certain part of the eyeball which allows them to physically see things us adults can't, it's something to do with infrasound or something. When you enter your teenage years that part of the eye becomes dormant or its use fades away or something. It apparently is supposed to explain why children can see ghosts etc which I thought was pretty cool. 

   

That is so bizarre! There are so many things like this which make me wonder whether child and teenagers do possess some sort of 'sight' (whether actual or not), which adults just don't have. 

Imaginary friends are interesting in this way. Are they, as was said, simply the result of overactive imaginations, or something else, like ghosts. Another thing, children are much more likely to suffer nightmares than adults. Is this another sign that children are more able to 'tuned in' to paranormal encounters?

- going beyond the scope of accepted scientific understanding -


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nightshade
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02/04/2017 5:41 pm  

I do believe children are much more sensitive to paranormal events than adults. Children are very open as they are still learning about the world whereas adults are very closed-minded and practical and are likely to debunk things they think they may have seen - more likely to shrug it off as imagining things.

Children on the other hand have a natural curiosity about the world around them and want to investigate and know more which I believe plays a part in them being more accepting to paranormal occurrences.

Of course I don't think every child who says they have an imaginary friend is seeing a ghost as there are genuinely children who have wild imaginations although it is extremely possible there is a very good mixture of children who 'see' and children who don't 'see' so to say.

It really is interesting to say the least. 🙂

"It's because you got no guts. Oh, how embarrassing... there they are. They were inside you the whole time. You did have guts. I've never been so wrong in my whole life!"


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scarygothgirl
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08/04/2017 2:37 pm  
Posted by: The Paranormal Scholar

 

Imaginary friends are interesting in this way. Are they, as was said, simply the result of overactive imaginations, or something else, like ghosts. Another thing, children are much more likely to suffer nightmares than adults. Is this another sign that children are more able to 'tuned in' to paranormal encounters?

   

I know plenty of adults who have imaginary friends! It's interesting though. I had an imaginary friend as an adult, and I just assumed that I was in full control of them as they existed in my imagination. But there was a time when I tried to speak to them and they had gone away and sent me a replacement, and I haven't been able to talk to them since. I've spoken to other adults with imaginary friends and I'm told it's quite common. I don't think it's a paranormal phenomenon, I suspect it's related to the subconscious and that maybe there's a part of your brain that tells you that you don't need the support of the imaginary friend anymore. 

Imaginary friends are interesting, and not something frequently studied in psychology. I have encountered one theory that suggests imaginary friends are a way of developing the ability to care for oneself. So if you know you need looking after but don't have anyone to look after you and/or haven't developed the ability to look after yourself you create a person from your subconscious to do it for you.

www.Ungendered.com - We care about what's in a person's heart, not their pants!


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